David Amerland

Social Media’s Disruptive Influence Enters Parenting

Social Media and Parenting
You know social media’s disruptive influence is spreading faster than anticipated and continues to have unexpected results when a blog that’s all about business, SEO, social media marketing and the effects of technology on society, suddenly has to talk about parenting.

Before we go any further I think you need to see the video below where an exasperated parent talks about his teenage daughter and takes some drastic correctional measures with the business end of .45, using hollow point rounds that cost $1 a pop.



How do you respond to this? I guess if you’re a parent, depending on the relationship you have with your own children and the age they are at you will either says ‘Heck yeah!’ and start considering whether a gun as a disciplinary object is such a bad idea or you will be horrified that a parent would consider humiliating their child so publicly and then taking such drastic measures to ‘correct’ what is, probably, a temper tantrum, albeit one which was publicly posted on Facebook and provoked, I guess, a lot of reactions from the girl’s circle of friends.

But that is the parental response.

I am a social media/SEO guy whose focus is on how the web, technology and the myriad ways all this interacts with us, comes together and my questions have more to do with the way society is evolving so that parenting, suddenly, becomes a social media issue with parents and children playing out their dramas, publicly, on the web.

There are a couple of thoughts which spring to mind here and, honestly, I am not quite sure which one is the right one. Either we, as a race, are so stressed-out by technology, so hard-pressed by work and a global credit system that’s still teetering on the verge of collapse that we are unable to connect with each other, as families, without the assistance of Facebook and YouTube or social media, which is all about connecting, creating new, more intimate relationships between geographically and socially disparate groups of people, is now breaking down the barriers between parents and allowing them to voice their exasperation with their kids.

Either way we are entering new ground. If we are really so hard-pressed by everything that the stress is causing us a major emotional disconnect then we need to start thinking about ways to balance technology and its use and work with a way that will ensure that the quality of our lives does not suffer.

If, on the other hand, social media is now doing its usual catalyst effect, breaking down walls maintained over centuries by parents whose parental duty, it might have been felt, was to maintain a brave face on the outside and pretend that their kids were just perfect, then the sudden ability social media gives for them to group around such incidents and actually share experiences and, quite possibly, responses, might lead us into paths were parenting, quite possibly the last bastion of personal isolation, improves through a digital, informal, support network.

I honestly want to know here, what do you think?

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